Overview

Multiutilities

The key role of multiutilities in favouring the sustainable recovery of Italian regions

The transition towards a more sustainable economic and social model is both inevitable and epoch-making for our society and, from this standpoint, the new European framework—from the Green Deal to the Next Generation EU mechanism introduced to take on the COVID-19 crisis—will contribute to a further acceleration. However, for the sustainable transition to be a widespread reality in Italy, all local economies must make a positive contribution and be actively involved in the process. Study prepared in collaboration with A2A.

The key role of multiutilities in favouring the sustainable recovery of Italian regions

The transition towards a more sustainable economic and social model is both inevitable and epoch-making for our society and, from this standpoint, the new European framework—from the Green Deal to the Next Generation EU mechanism introduced to take on the COVID-19 crisis—will contribute to a further acceleration.

However, for the sustainable transition to be a widespread reality in Italy, all local economies must make a positive contribution and be actively involved in the process.

Thanks to their local presence, but also the fact that they contribute to a full 9 of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals through the supply of essential services to the public, the multiutilities are natural candidates for being the “transmission belts” of the sustainable transition in Italy. The areas of activity they are involved in—ranging from energy to the environment, waste, water cycle, grid management, transport and public lighting—constitute, in fact, the key aspects in the transition towards a sustainable development paradigm and must be implemented on a local level to have a concrete, long-term effect.

Towards this, the study by The European House – Ambrosetti provides a picture of Italy and its various local economies in three key areas for a sustainable transition: energy, the environment and water cycle. The study highlights the gaps that currently exist locally in Italy compared with European best practices, as well as the system-wide problem areas, for example the bureaucratic red-tape required to authorize new utility-scale installations to generate electricity from renewable sources and the installation gap for more efficient waste management which, if not properly addressed, risks compromising the attainment of the national targets that have been set.

 

Read the Report (italian version)

Conceptual Map (italian version)

Press release (italian version)

Presentation by Lorenzo Tavazzi (italian version)


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