Overview

GLOBAL ATTRACTIVENESS INDEX

How much is Italy really worth?

Are the methodologies used to construct the leading international rankings of attractiveness and competitiveness of the countries and their economies always reliable and correct?
This was the topic of discussion during a round table in which the Global Attractiveness Index was presented, an innovative index developed by The European House – Ambrosetti in collaboration with three multinationals (ABB, Unilever and Toyota Material Handling).

How much is Italy really worth?

Managing the pro-business image of our country and building the best investment conditions for companies

The competitiveness rankings published by international organizations and private bodies that are circulated on a worldwide basis have a significant impact on guiding the strategic and investment decisions of companies, as well as positioning a country and its economy in the eyes of the international community. Over the last ten years (and more), in virtually all the most authoritative rankings, Italy has almost always appeared in the lowest positions among the advanced economies and often behind developing areas. It is clear that these rankings, even considering the problematic aspects of Italy and its economy, represent a significant distortion of reality and clash with the actual capabilities of the country, and, together with other factors, result in a cascade of negative effects.

Are the methodologies used to construct the leading international rankings of attractiveness and competitiveness of the countries and their economies always reliable and correct?

This was the topic of discussion in Rome during a round table organized by the Ambrosetti Club in which, starting from a detailed analysis of these methodologies and their problematic areas, the Global Attractiveness Index was presented, an innovative index developed by The European House – Ambrosetti in collaboration with three multinationals (ABB, Unilever and Toyota Material Handling). This new index has been designed to fill the gaps emerging from surveys performed, by analyzing the physical, social, human and natural capital of 144 countries representing 97.9% of global GDP through 50 KPIs divided into four major areas of attractiveness that shift Italy’s ranking from 45th to 14th place in terms of country attractiveness.

According to the Global Attractiveness Index, Italy is in 14th place, immediately behind Hong Kong and ahead of Austria, and fifth among European countries after France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Germany (second). The United States and Japan are, respectively, first and third.

Matteo Marini, President of ABB Italia and head of the Power Grids division, believes Italy’s image abroad is poorly portrayed: “I don’t think the country is as badly off as is sometimes said. Italian excellence can be seen in the solidity of its expertise, the dynamic ferment in innovation and the quality of its manufacturing sector. I believe an index that is developed taking into account all variables is capable of uniting the ambitions and innate abilities of the nation within a more realistic and objective image of the overall patrimony of our economic and social system.”

“The index regarding confidence is encouraging, but a major push must be given to consumption,” stated Angelo Trocchia, President and CEO of Unilever Italia. “An agenda must be drawn up to attract foreign investment to Italy.” How? By stimulating that of companies already present and transforming them into positive examples capable of attracting investment from abroad, and supporting the economic image of Italy. Public-private collaboration becomes central to making a number of fundamental steps and reactivating a positive cycle that can lead to growth. And who better than a multinational like Unilever, active in Italy for over 50 years with its 5 production facilities, to provide evidence of the value of foreign investment in Italy?”

Leonardo Salcerini, CEO of Toyota Material Handling Italia, also stresses the regional differences in Italy. “Italy has high quality managers and on a corporate level, this factor has always made the difference in deciding whether to locate production here or elsewhere. However, it should be said that Italy seems divided in two and that some areas in the North are absolutely up to the highest standards. There is no problem upholding the value of this Italy, but it is much more difficult defending other areas of the country.”

Finally, Valerio De Molli, Managing Partner of The European House – Ambrosetti: “In today’s unstable political, economic and social climate, attracting and activating investment as a lever for growth remains a priority issue for all countries. Over time, international rankings have become a tool that orients investment choices and, for this reason, analyzing their credibility should be seen as an institutional goal for many countries, such as Italy, whose standing in the majority of the principal country rankings offers significant distortions. Through the Global Attractiveness Index, we have attempted to throw light on these while also offering a highly-innovative and reliable index for managing and communicating country image.”


Find out more here:

Measuring country attractiveness and managing the pro-business image of Italy




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